Bibliography: Nearly Three Centuries of Enslavement

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A man stands in front of the Djingareyber mosque on February 4, 2016 in Timbuktu, central Mali. 
Mali's fabled city of Timbuktu on February 4 celebrated the recovery of its historic mausoleums, destroyed during an Islamist takeover of northern Mali in 2012 and rebuilt thanks to UN cultural agency UNESCO.
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Carton, Evan. Patriotic Treason: John Brown and the Soul of America. New York, NY: Free Press, 2006.

Drescher, Seymour. Abolition: A History of Slavery and Antislavery. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

Hartman, Saidiya. Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007.

Hendrick, Willene. Fleeing For Freedom: Stories of the Underground Railroad as Told by Levi Coffin and William Still. Chicago, IL: Ivan R. Dee, 2004.

Mayer, Henry. All on Fire: William Lloyd Garrison and the Abolition of Slavery. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company, 1998.

McBride, James. The Good Lord Bird.  New York, NY: Riverhead Books, 2013.

McInnis, Maurie D. Slaves Waiting For Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 2011.

Northup Solomon. Twelve Years A Slave. Eakin Create Space Independent Publishing Platform, 2014.

Paulson, Gary. Nightjohn. New York, NY: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, 1995.

Perry, Mark. Lift Up Thy Voice: The Grimke Family’s Journey From Slaveholders To Civil Rights Leaders. New York, NY: Penguin Books, 2001.

Rediker, Marcus. The Slave Ship: A Human History. New York: Viking Press, 2007.

Reynolds, David S. Mightier Than The Sword: Uncle Tom’s Cabin and the Battle for America. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company Inc., 2011.

Schama, Simon. Rough Crossings: The Slaves, the British, and the American Revolution. New York: Harper Collins, 2006.

Stauffer, John. Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. New York, NY: Hatchet Book Group, 2008.

Stowe, Harriet Beecher.  Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Boston, MA: John P. Jewett & Company, 1852.

Webber, Christopher L. American Backbone: The Life of James W.C. Pennington, the Slave Who Became One of the First Black Abolitionists. New York, NY: Pegasus Books, 2011.

Wilson, Harriet. Our Nig: or, Sketches From the Life of a Free Black, in a Two-Story White House, North: Showing That Slavery’s Shadows Fall Even There. A Public Domain Book, 1808.

 

2 Comments

  1. Matine Spence on October 26, 2015 at 9:27 AM

    Thank you for constructing such an extensive virtual museum. Can I suggest deeply moving books on slavery to add to your bibliography?

    Marcus Rediker, The Slave Ship: A Human History, New York: Viking Press, 2007. Alice Walker wrote that after reading this book she took to her bed for several days “there to ponder the madness…, the sadism…, the violence…. For all Americans… this book is homework of the most insistent order.”

    Simon Schama, Rough Crossings: The Slaves, the British, and the American Revolution, New York: Harper Collins, 2006,

    Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007.

    • dr_fran on October 27, 2015 at 6:03 PM

      Thank you, Matine, for your kind words and for the great additions to our bibliography. They will be added shortly.

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