An old Virginia plantation, a new owner and a family legacy unveiled

His roots were deep in this part of Pittsylvania County, and he wanted to buy a place where his vast extended family, many of whom still live nearby, could gather. He didn’t know it had once been a plantation or that 58 people had once been enslaved there. He never considered that its past had anything to do with him.

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America’s Black Holocaust Museum receives a $10 million commitment!

America’s Black Holocaust Museum (ABHM) is the recipient of a $10 million commitment made by an anonymous donor through the Greater Milwaukee Foundation. This transformational commitment is in support of ABHM’s recent announcement to reopen on February 25, 2022, and a strategic plan by NMBL Strategies that provides a roadmap to growth and sustainability for generations to come.

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We’re Re-Opening & Recruiting! Great Job Opportunities at ABHM

America’s Black Holocaust Museum (ABHM) is the recipient of a $10 million commitment made by an anonymous donor through the Greater Milwaukee Foundation. This transformational commitment is in support of ABHM’s recent announcement to reopen on February 25, 2022, and a strategic plan by NMBL Strategies that provides a roadmap to growth and sustainability for generations to come.

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Melvin Van Peebles, Champion of New Black Cinema, Dies at 89

Melvin Van Peebles, known as the godfather of modern Black cinema and a trailblazer in American independent movies, has died. He was 89. A Renaissance man whose work spanned books, theater and music, Mr. Van Peebles is best known for his third feature film, “Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song.” Mr. Van Peebles’s fiercely independent legacy can be seen in some of the most notable Black films of the past half-century.

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He Taught About White Privilege and Got Fired. Now He’s Fighting to Get His Job Back

In his Contemporary Issues class that day at a Tennessee school, social studies teacher Matthew Hawn led a discussion of the shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha WI. Over the next several months, Hawn, 43, used the news cycle to show students, almost all of whom are white, how systemic racism is an indisputable element of American life. When he got fired, Hawn became one of the first casualties from the nation’s debate this year over “critical race theory” and whether or how teachers should acknowledge racism in class.

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George Marshall Clark: Unmarked Grave of Milwaukee Lynching Victim Gets Headstone After 160 Years

Nearly two centuries after his brief life and brutal death were entered into public record as the only recorded lynching in Milwaukee history, George Marshall Clark’s unmarked grave was memorialized with a granite headstone during a special ceremony at Forest Home Cemetery on September 8. The moving event was sponsored by ABHM and Forest Home Cemetery.

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Watch: America’s Racist History of Labor

Labor Day became a federal holiday in 1894 after a railroad strike led by the American Railway Union known as the Pullman Strike. This was a turning point in the labor movement, though it didn’t benefit all American workers. Black Pullman porters weren’t allowed to participate in the strike because they were not allowed in the white unions. But black people did unionize. In this exhibit, you can watch a short video about the history of the Labor Movement.

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